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Star Magnolia shrubs and trees

starmagnolia

Magnolia stellata, also known as star magnolia, is a shrub or small tree that is slow-growing and native to Japan. These have large, white or pink fragrant flowers with 12-30 thin petals that bloom early in March. Before these flowers bloom, in late winter, this tree begins to grow groups of fuzzy buds waiting to blossom. The flower, once bloomed, requires shelter from frost and wind, which can discolor the blooms.

Star Magnolias grow anywhere from 10 to 20 feet with an 8 to 15 feet spread with a rounded crown shape for a tree or a large oval to rounded shrub. They are best grown in moist, well-drained organic soil in full sun to partial shade, and are intolerant of most urban pollutants. Star Magnolias require medium maintenance of pruning, which should be done after flowering to avoid ridding the tree of its buds that are set for the next season. They grow best when protected from high winds, and it is best to avoid planting these in southern exposures where the buds may open too early in late winter.

Remaining small and compact for several years, Star magnolia is a great flowering tree for a small yard. These can be incorporated with other trees and shrubs into a planted bed for a great look. Try planting near a dark background such as a brick wall or darker trees to show off the flowers. Star Magnolias are great to plant near your patio or deck, where you can enjoy the flowering scents all season long.

For expert advice and the best opinion on where to put your Star Magnolia, consult an Arbor Hills Trees consultant today.

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Considering a Japanese Maple? Read on for helpful information…

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The varieties of the ornamental Japanese Red Maple all with apt names – Bloodgood, Crimson Queen, Red Dragon – will definitely add an eye-catching splash of color to your property in the spring and fall. In the summer its leaves can fade in color or even turn green.

The Bloodgood variety will keep a deep reddish purple leaf throughout the summer.

The Japanese Red Maple offers slow to medium growth and a round-shaped canopy.  Its maximum height is 15 to 25 feet and it grows to a 20 foot spread.

If you want your yard to be your own wildlife sanctuary, the Japanese Red Maple is perfect. Squirrels are fond of maples seeds, which will also attract many songbirds.

The Japanese Red Maple is somewhat drought resistant once established, but prefers moist well-drained soil.

Its leaves spread symmetrically from a central point like fingers from the palm of hand. In fact, the Japanese word “momiji” is sometimes applied to the tree in Japan and has two meanings, one of them being “baby’s hands.” The other meaning is “becomes crimson leaves.”

If you’re considering planting a mature Japanese Red Maple consult with Arbor Hills Tree Farm. We can guide you through the purchase and even implement the planting to complement your current landscaping through Arbor Hills Landscaping.

Tree Facts That Make You Stop and Think!

Tree Facts That Make You Stop and Think!
By: Hilary Rinaldi

Trees receive an estimated 90% of their nutrition from the atmosphere and only 10% from the soil.

Trees grow from the top, not from the bottom as is commonly believed. A branch’s location on a tree will only move up the trunk a few inches in 1000 years.

No tree dies of old age. They are generally killed by insects, disease or by people. California Bristlecone Pines and Giant Sequoias are regarded as the oldest trees and have been known to live 4,000 to 5,000 years.

There are about 20,000 tree species in the world. The United States has one of the largest tree treasuries second only to India.

The largest area of forest in the tropics remains the Amazon Basin, amounting to 81.5 million acres.

Arbor Day was first observed in Nebraska in 1872. That state is now home to one of the world’s largest forests planted by people – over 200,000 acres of trees.

Some trees can “talk” to each other. When willows are attacked by webworms and caterpillars, they emit a chemical that alerts nearby willow of the danger. The neighboring trees then respond by pumping more tannin into their leaves making it difficult for the insects to digest the leaves.

Knocking on wood for good luck originated from primitive tree worship when rapping on trees was believed to summon protective spirits in the trees.

Trees can induce rainfall by cooling the land and transpiring water into the sky from their leaves. An acre of maple trees can put as much as 20,000 gallons of water into the air each day.

The most massive living thing on earth is the Giant Sequoia in the Redwood Forest of California. It stands nearly 30 stories tall and 82.3 feet in circumference. Its weight is estimated at 2,756 tons.

In Arnold, California, a tree still stands with a legible inscription carved into it in 1849 by pioneers blazing paths to California during the Gold Rush. The inscription reads “49 Road.”

Hilary Rinaldi is a professional landscaper who has written for gardening publications such as “Seed Trade News” and “Houseplant Magazine”. She also has been a professional public speaker and educator in the gardening industry for over 20 years sharing gardening information and tips to as many people as she can.